Compulsive Creative Writers

I apologize for the gap in my blogging. Most of my writing has seen this gap. Between midterms and finals my school work, plus work, plus everything else, was just too much and I gave up a lot. Not just my writing, my walking suffered a severe drop as well. I’ve found a way to fix that, but it was a little late, and I’m embarrassed to say, I did not meet my Walk to Rivendell goals for the month. And before we go on to the main attraction a few quick words. First: Happy May Day! Second: We bought a house! Yay! One thing down, a million more to go.

I read an article recently that compulsive liars may be creative writers in disguise. And while I can no longer find that article, it got me to wondering. Why do people lie? It turns out that there is a “disease” called compulsive lying, which is completely different from a normal lie, I suppose, and it’s also different from people who lie because they are sociopathic. But does that mean people who have an “overactive” imagination (not to be confused with psychosis) are automatically liars? Well, the first step is define what a compulsive liar is and what is an overactive imagination.

Compulsive liars are creatures of habit. Lying is an addictive trait, much like drinking and smoking, and has similar effects on people and relationships. A compulsive liar is someone who feels best when lying rather than telling the truth. According to the Truth About Deception, compulsive liars often experience a time early in their life where lying has become necessary, the child of an abusive parent lying about their bruises for example, and from that they start lying about everything.The website futher states that “Lying feels right to a compulsive liar. Telling the truth, on the other hand, is difficult and uncomfortable.” Unlike manipulative sociopaths, compulsive liars are simply creatures of habit. This problem can be a symptom of a bigger, and more distressing personality disorder. In addition, this habit can ruin a relationship. There is help for compulsive liars, however, like most addictive behaviors, getting the person to see their own problem is difficult and often leaves them at rock bottom.

Overactive imagination, on the other hand, isn’t easily defined. What is overactive to one may not be active enough to another. The definition of imagination is the ability to “think of clever and original ideas, possibilities, or solutions.” Whereas the definition of overactive is being abnormally excessive. I suppose that there a certain amount of “normal” imaginative abilities, we all have dreams don’t we? And that does take some imagination. The ability for people to dream is only a small step into the deep waters of the imagination. The way I would define an overactive imagination is a person who, while they can tell what is reality, they can experience the imaginary on a sensory level. They can, willingly, see the worlds they (or another) have created, smell the flowers and feel the breeze. They can feel the emotions of invented people. And it is a person with an overactive imagination, in my opinion at least, that makes the best writer.

What does all this mean? I suppose that this could mean different things to everyone who reads this. To me, all this means is that compulsive liars were in some way unhappy with thier lives and fell upon lying as a way to make up for it. I believe that compulsive liars have overactive imaginations, and if it could be caught early enough it could be steered towards more productive, artistic, means. I believe that the article I read could be right, and that with the proper direction liars could stop lying and start writing, or painting, or finding another outlet for their feel-good fix.

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1 Comment

Filed under Just for Fun, The Writing Life, Writing

One response to “Compulsive Creative Writers

  1. Thanks for the reposting! :)

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